Wednesday, October 05, 2011

Comic Book Advertisements!

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This week's ads come from Gold Key's Hanna-Barbera Fun-In #1, although as always, they likely appeared in all this month's Gold Key comics! The first ad, from the inside front cover, is for a Hot Wheels set. As I've noted before, Mattel's biggest toy successes were Barbie and Hot Wheels, probably the two longest-lasting toy lines of any kind (well, I'd imagine Matchbox comes in close, too). Have I mentioned before how I get some sticker shock whenever I shop for Hot Wheels stuff for my son Tristan these days? I have no idea if prices on the track sets are overall higher (relatively speaking) than they were back in the 1960s and 1970s or if they're the same, but if they were the same, I can see why I never got the number of sets you'd need to make this kind of layout when I was a kid!

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Another thing I've noted in prior posts was how popular stamp collecting used to be, and how advertisers must've thought there was a tie-in market between kids who read comics and kids who collect stamps (or were interested in starting). And sure, there was probably some cross-over, to be sure! But can I just say that the cover of the book shown in this ad does not convey anything exciting about this hobby, no matter what the blurb indicates?

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This ad is pretty much here to remind us how much things have changed... BB guns were advertised a lot in comics when I was a kid (and for many years prior to that)... I don't believe I've seen a new BB gun ad anywhere for years and years!

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And the last ad this time around is this full-page ad for Kenner's Zip Strip toy line. Now, I don't claim to be an expert on all toys that were out when I was a kid by any means, but I thought I remmebered most of the toys that were around... and this odd car toy seems like something that would've stood out in my memory! But no, this is something I have no memory of at all, so I can only assume the line didn't do well.

I should also mention here that there seems that there was definitely some kind of relationship going on involving Kenner, Hanna-Barbera, and Gold Key... Kenner definitely did a lot of Hanna-Barbera licensing (especially with the Give-A-Show and Easy-Show Projectors), and advertised a lot in Gold Key's books, and in turn Gold Key published a lot of Hanna-Barbera character books (once they split off from Dell, anyway... and of course, excepting the period when Charlton was doing them). In prior postings, I've shown the Kenner catalog that was actually published inside some Gold Key comics, too. It must've worked for all three companies, given how long it lasted!

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